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Available in print and e-book versions at
Life At The Intersection.

Contact Terri Lyon with questions about book bundles and
bulk orders.

Who is this book for?

  Make a Difference With Mental Health Activism is for you if:

 

  • You are the 1 in 6 children and teens (7.7 million) in the United States with a mental health diagnosis who lives this reality every day (9.7% or 2.3 million youth aged 12-17 have severe major depression.)

  • You are the 1 in 5 adults (51.5 million) in the United States with a mental health diagnosis, the lived experience, who knows the impact all too well. (According to the CDC, this number doubled to 2 in 5 by early 2021.)

  • You are the 1 in 8.4 million caregivers of someone with a diagnosis.

  • You are a friend, neighbor, or coworker of someone with mental illness.

  • You are someone who has compassion for another human being who, through no fault of their own, does not always have control over their thoughts, feelings, and behavior.

 

What will you learn?

Terri Lyon's 2018 ground-breaking book What's On Your Sign? How to focus your passion and change the world introduced new activists to the 5-step Activism Path, a road map of sorts on which you would follow the signs to better recognize your talents and experiences and passions. The original 5-step path helps you:

 

  • find your specific area of passion for mental health,

  • identify your gifts,

  • craft your ideal opportunities,

  • monitor your success, and

  • stay motivated.

 

With Make a Difference With Mental Health Activism, you will travel that same Activism Path, with examples, real activist profiles, and resources geared specifically to mental health, suicide prevention, and addiction activism. 

Diane Donovan, Literary Reviews

 

Many situations in life seem to hold no promise of change; but Make a Difference with Mental Health Activism presents a different view. The book advocates for the personal power of engaging with community to make a real difference in peoples' lives by influencing social issues. 

Because America's mental health system is currently a mess doesn't mean that empowerment and change aren't possible. Indeed, in a foreword by journalist and mental health activist Pete Earley, the onus for change is placed squarely on the shoulders of the reader: "There should be no shame in having a mental illness, only shame in not helping someone who does." 

Terri L. Lyon and Trish Lockard's audience can be those with mental health conditions themselves, friends and loved ones, or caregivers. Anyone cognizant of the issues involved in mental health treatments and management will find book inspiring and a call to action: "Activism could be the difference between continued stigma, lack of parity, and shame of those with mental health disorders and advanced awareness, increased services, and emotional support." 

The time for change may be now, but the question remains as to how that change can happen. The authors address this central piece by presenting profiles of ordinary people who used their diverse abilities to make a difference in mental health care. 

Read the entire review here.